Pilot Darrells Square.jpg

Pilot Darrell's Square

Pilot Darrell's SquareLance Furbert
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St. Peter's Church in St. George, Bermuda is believed to be the oldest continually used Anglican church in the Western hemisphere. The original wooden church built 1612 was destroyed in a storm and replaced by the present church. The church was extended in 1713 and the clock tower was added in the 19th century.

Outside is a churchyard cemetery with a wall separating two graveyards. A walled area to the far west of the church was for slaves and free blacks while the one east of the wall was reserved for whites. The graveyard for slaves and free blacks is a significant site on the African Diaspora Heritage Trail of Bermuda which traces the legacy of Bermuda's slavery.

In 1698, St. George had a population of 1,124, one-third of whom were blacks who were mostly brought in from Africa as slaves. As the blacks converted to Christianity they became entitled to Christian burials. In the latter half of the 17th century the existing graveyard was extended to the west for the burial of both slaves and free blacks.

A bronze plaque on the wall on the left side of the entrance to the burial ground is inscribed:
 

BURIAL GROUND
FOR ENSLAVED
AND FREE BLACKS

PLAQUE ERECTED IN 1997 BY
THE ST. GEORGE'S CRICKET CLUB.

A bronze plaque on the wall on the right side of the entrance to the burial ground identifies it as an official UNESCO Slave Route Site. The central part of the plaque depicts a black family, a mother, father and two children walking hand in hand between a palm tree and a deciduous tree and above a stone wall. The plaque is inscribed: